Sunday, April 7, 2013

Orienteering at Keystone State Park

A male blue bird perches on a a bluebird box at Codorus State Park, Pennsylvania.
Keystone State Park  is a great state park.  It has activities for everyone.  One of the activities this weekend included orienteering.  Orienteering is a family of sports that requires navigational skills using a map and compass to navigate from point to point in diverse and usually unfamiliar terrain, and normally moving at a good pace. Participants use a special topographical orienteering map to find control points.[1] Originally a training exercise in land navigation for military officers, orienteering has developed into a varied sport with navigation as the central key element. Among the oldest and the most popular is foot orienteering.  I hope the rain today did not keep those with an adventurous spirit from trying out this fun outdoor activity.

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Check Out The Fiction Writers Review Online Today!

We all need inspiration and what better way to be inspired then to read what other writers are writing.  Fiction Writers Review is a GREAT resource of the latest writers works and reviews of their words.

Below is an excerpt of the latest reviews online. Above is a link to website Fiction Writers Review.  Check out what is out there and be inspired to write and get published today.

Welcome to Fiction Writers Review, an online literary journal by, for, and about emerging writers

Latest Features

<em>The Carriage House</em>, by Louisa Hall

The Carriage House, by Louisa Hall

Louisa Hall’s debut novel, The Carriage House, works through the tensions children face in a family that values tradition over individual autonomy, while speaking to the dilemma of writing from—and reading about—the perspective of characters who are privileged.
<em>All That Is</em>, by James Salter

All That Is, by James Salter

“Nostalgia, of course, is the most powerful form of lust: portable as your memories, infinitely rechargeable, and impossible to slake.” Dan Keane reviews James Salter’s new novel, All That Is.
<em>A Map of Tulsa,</em> by Benjamin Lytal

A Map of Tulsa, by Benjamin Lytal

J.T. Bushnell reviews Benjamin Lytal’s coming-of-age debut novel, “a vision of youth from the inside.”
<em>A Tale for the Time Being</em>, by Ruth Ozeki

A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki

A writer named Ruth finds a Hello Kitty lunchbox on the beach near her Pacific-Northwest island home that contains artifacts from a young Japanese girl’s life, setting off a meditation on suicide, the reader-writer relationship, and the human experience of time.
Your Gut is a Liar: An Interview with J. Robert Lennon

Your Gut is a Liar: An Interview with J. Robert Lennon

Dan Keane talks with J. Robert Lennon about his new book, Familiar, as well as oversharing, life online, and the perils of writing from the gut.
We’re All Pliable Creatures: An Interview with Jared Yates Sexton

We’re All Pliable Creatures: An Interview with Jared Yates Sexton

Nick Ostdick sits down with Jared Yates Sexton to talk about his new collection, An End to All Things, as well as writing “Recession America” stories, gauging story arcs in terms of “how the plane lands,” and constructing new worlds.
A Writer's Family Tree: An Interview with Elizabeth McCracken and V.V. Ganeshananthan

A Writer’s Family Tree: An Interview with Elizabeth McCracken and V.V. Ganeshananthan

Learning from your teachers’ teachers: Elizabeth McCracken, V.V. Ganeshananthan, and Rebecca Scherm discuss the writing chain of influence.
[Quotes & Notes] Kafka’s Eleven Sons: A No-Project Blues in D-minor

[Quotes & Notes] Kafka’s Eleven Sons: A No-Project Blues in D-minor

Steven Wingate tackles his process on tackling the next project.